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Obama Signs Microbead Ban Into Law

Obama Signs Microbead Ban Into Law


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Microbead manufacturing will be banned in July 2017, and product-specific manufacturing and sales bans will follow

The act defines microbeads as “any solid plastic particle” less than five millimeters in size.

On December 28, President Obama signed the bipartisan “Microbead-Free Waters Act of 2015,” which “prohibits the manufacture and introduction into interstate commerce of rinse-off cosmetics containing intentionally-added plastic microbeads.”

Microbeads have been cause for concern with scientists reporting microbead pollution in U.S. lakes, rivers, and the oceans, says MLive. They have been shown to filter through municipal wastewater treatment plants after they are rinsed down the drain by consumers. Pollutants can attach to the microbeads and enter the food chain through fish and other wildlife that consume the microbeads, mistaking them for food.

“The law will phase microbeads out of consumer products over the next few years, starting with a ban on manufacturing the beads in July 2017, followed by product-specific manufacturing and sales bans in 2018 and 2019,” says MLive. The act defines microbeads as “any solid plastic particle” smaller than five millimeters intended to be used as an exfoliant.


How Can I Tell if a Product Has Microbeads in it?

Fortunately, several months ago President Obama signed a new law that will phase microbeads out of cosmetic personal care products. For the most part, this was a very strong bill and it sailed through both houses of Congress in the political equivalent of a blink of an eye. Bizarro world? Opposite day? Whatever your explanation, it was definitely out of the ordinary.

How on earth did a clean piece of environmental legislation get through a conservative Congress so easily? As it has done so often in the past, the state of California led the way. A few states had enacted microbead bans prior to the federal ban, but it was California’s that drew the ire of industry by closing a critical loophole that was present in several other state bans including Illinois, Colorado and Indiana.

This strong industry opposition resulted in a two-year roller coaster ride through the California legislature and culminated in a squeaker of a vote — with a ban just barely being signed into law. This was a very public and bruising defeat for an industry that cares very deeply about how it is perceived and they finally saw the writing on the wall. When a federal microbead ban — based on California’s — was introduced, it had little to no public opposition.

While this is great news, it will take a couple of years for microbeads to leave store shelves. So in the interim, a quick glance at the label will tell you what you need to know. Steer clear of products containing “polyethylene” or “polypropylene.” Be aware that the major weakness of the microbead ban is that non rinse-off cosmetics, like makeup and lip gloss, are not covered. So double check that label before getting gussied up.

When it comes to plastic, consumer choice can be influential and it is always good to be better informed about the products you buy. But it is important to realize that consumer demand alone will not solve our plastic pollution problem. The entire system is stacked to prevent consumer choice. When enough plastic has been manufactured to coat our entire planet in plastic wrap, anything less than a complete paradigm shift is simply not good enough.

But as we’ve seen with the microbead ban, change can happen — and even grassroots organizers in California can defeat powerful interests and drive national change. States and local municipalities continue to lead the way and I urge you to get involved in any capacity you are able.

For more info, check out our plastics campaign to see how the Center is working to affect change


How Can I Tell if a Product Has Microbeads in it?

Fortunately, several months ago President Obama signed a new law that will phase microbeads out of cosmetic personal care products. For the most part, this was a very strong bill and it sailed through both houses of Congress in the political equivalent of a blink of an eye. Bizarro world? Opposite day? Whatever your explanation, it was definitely out of the ordinary.

How on earth did a clean piece of environmental legislation get through a conservative Congress so easily? As it has done so often in the past, the state of California led the way. A few states had enacted microbead bans prior to the federal ban, but it was California’s that drew the ire of industry by closing a critical loophole that was present in several other state bans including Illinois, Colorado and Indiana.

This strong industry opposition resulted in a two-year roller coaster ride through the California legislature and culminated in a squeaker of a vote — with a ban just barely being signed into law. This was a very public and bruising defeat for an industry that cares very deeply about how it is perceived and they finally saw the writing on the wall. When a federal microbead ban — based on California’s — was introduced, it had little to no public opposition.

While this is great news, it will take a couple of years for microbeads to leave store shelves. So in the interim, a quick glance at the label will tell you what you need to know. Steer clear of products containing “polyethylene” or “polypropylene.” Be aware that the major weakness of the microbead ban is that non rinse-off cosmetics, like makeup and lip gloss, are not covered. So double check that label before getting gussied up.

When it comes to plastic, consumer choice can be influential and it is always good to be better informed about the products you buy. But it is important to realize that consumer demand alone will not solve our plastic pollution problem. The entire system is stacked to prevent consumer choice. When enough plastic has been manufactured to coat our entire planet in plastic wrap, anything less than a complete paradigm shift is simply not good enough.

But as we’ve seen with the microbead ban, change can happen — and even grassroots organizers in California can defeat powerful interests and drive national change. States and local municipalities continue to lead the way and I urge you to get involved in any capacity you are able.

For more info, check out our plastics campaign to see how the Center is working to affect change


How Can I Tell if a Product Has Microbeads in it?

Fortunately, several months ago President Obama signed a new law that will phase microbeads out of cosmetic personal care products. For the most part, this was a very strong bill and it sailed through both houses of Congress in the political equivalent of a blink of an eye. Bizarro world? Opposite day? Whatever your explanation, it was definitely out of the ordinary.

How on earth did a clean piece of environmental legislation get through a conservative Congress so easily? As it has done so often in the past, the state of California led the way. A few states had enacted microbead bans prior to the federal ban, but it was California’s that drew the ire of industry by closing a critical loophole that was present in several other state bans including Illinois, Colorado and Indiana.

This strong industry opposition resulted in a two-year roller coaster ride through the California legislature and culminated in a squeaker of a vote — with a ban just barely being signed into law. This was a very public and bruising defeat for an industry that cares very deeply about how it is perceived and they finally saw the writing on the wall. When a federal microbead ban — based on California’s — was introduced, it had little to no public opposition.

While this is great news, it will take a couple of years for microbeads to leave store shelves. So in the interim, a quick glance at the label will tell you what you need to know. Steer clear of products containing “polyethylene” or “polypropylene.” Be aware that the major weakness of the microbead ban is that non rinse-off cosmetics, like makeup and lip gloss, are not covered. So double check that label before getting gussied up.

When it comes to plastic, consumer choice can be influential and it is always good to be better informed about the products you buy. But it is important to realize that consumer demand alone will not solve our plastic pollution problem. The entire system is stacked to prevent consumer choice. When enough plastic has been manufactured to coat our entire planet in plastic wrap, anything less than a complete paradigm shift is simply not good enough.

But as we’ve seen with the microbead ban, change can happen — and even grassroots organizers in California can defeat powerful interests and drive national change. States and local municipalities continue to lead the way and I urge you to get involved in any capacity you are able.

For more info, check out our plastics campaign to see how the Center is working to affect change


How Can I Tell if a Product Has Microbeads in it?

Fortunately, several months ago President Obama signed a new law that will phase microbeads out of cosmetic personal care products. For the most part, this was a very strong bill and it sailed through both houses of Congress in the political equivalent of a blink of an eye. Bizarro world? Opposite day? Whatever your explanation, it was definitely out of the ordinary.

How on earth did a clean piece of environmental legislation get through a conservative Congress so easily? As it has done so often in the past, the state of California led the way. A few states had enacted microbead bans prior to the federal ban, but it was California’s that drew the ire of industry by closing a critical loophole that was present in several other state bans including Illinois, Colorado and Indiana.

This strong industry opposition resulted in a two-year roller coaster ride through the California legislature and culminated in a squeaker of a vote — with a ban just barely being signed into law. This was a very public and bruising defeat for an industry that cares very deeply about how it is perceived and they finally saw the writing on the wall. When a federal microbead ban — based on California’s — was introduced, it had little to no public opposition.

While this is great news, it will take a couple of years for microbeads to leave store shelves. So in the interim, a quick glance at the label will tell you what you need to know. Steer clear of products containing “polyethylene” or “polypropylene.” Be aware that the major weakness of the microbead ban is that non rinse-off cosmetics, like makeup and lip gloss, are not covered. So double check that label before getting gussied up.

When it comes to plastic, consumer choice can be influential and it is always good to be better informed about the products you buy. But it is important to realize that consumer demand alone will not solve our plastic pollution problem. The entire system is stacked to prevent consumer choice. When enough plastic has been manufactured to coat our entire planet in plastic wrap, anything less than a complete paradigm shift is simply not good enough.

But as we’ve seen with the microbead ban, change can happen — and even grassroots organizers in California can defeat powerful interests and drive national change. States and local municipalities continue to lead the way and I urge you to get involved in any capacity you are able.

For more info, check out our plastics campaign to see how the Center is working to affect change


How Can I Tell if a Product Has Microbeads in it?

Fortunately, several months ago President Obama signed a new law that will phase microbeads out of cosmetic personal care products. For the most part, this was a very strong bill and it sailed through both houses of Congress in the political equivalent of a blink of an eye. Bizarro world? Opposite day? Whatever your explanation, it was definitely out of the ordinary.

How on earth did a clean piece of environmental legislation get through a conservative Congress so easily? As it has done so often in the past, the state of California led the way. A few states had enacted microbead bans prior to the federal ban, but it was California’s that drew the ire of industry by closing a critical loophole that was present in several other state bans including Illinois, Colorado and Indiana.

This strong industry opposition resulted in a two-year roller coaster ride through the California legislature and culminated in a squeaker of a vote — with a ban just barely being signed into law. This was a very public and bruising defeat for an industry that cares very deeply about how it is perceived and they finally saw the writing on the wall. When a federal microbead ban — based on California’s — was introduced, it had little to no public opposition.

While this is great news, it will take a couple of years for microbeads to leave store shelves. So in the interim, a quick glance at the label will tell you what you need to know. Steer clear of products containing “polyethylene” or “polypropylene.” Be aware that the major weakness of the microbead ban is that non rinse-off cosmetics, like makeup and lip gloss, are not covered. So double check that label before getting gussied up.

When it comes to plastic, consumer choice can be influential and it is always good to be better informed about the products you buy. But it is important to realize that consumer demand alone will not solve our plastic pollution problem. The entire system is stacked to prevent consumer choice. When enough plastic has been manufactured to coat our entire planet in plastic wrap, anything less than a complete paradigm shift is simply not good enough.

But as we’ve seen with the microbead ban, change can happen — and even grassroots organizers in California can defeat powerful interests and drive national change. States and local municipalities continue to lead the way and I urge you to get involved in any capacity you are able.

For more info, check out our plastics campaign to see how the Center is working to affect change


How Can I Tell if a Product Has Microbeads in it?

Fortunately, several months ago President Obama signed a new law that will phase microbeads out of cosmetic personal care products. For the most part, this was a very strong bill and it sailed through both houses of Congress in the political equivalent of a blink of an eye. Bizarro world? Opposite day? Whatever your explanation, it was definitely out of the ordinary.

How on earth did a clean piece of environmental legislation get through a conservative Congress so easily? As it has done so often in the past, the state of California led the way. A few states had enacted microbead bans prior to the federal ban, but it was California’s that drew the ire of industry by closing a critical loophole that was present in several other state bans including Illinois, Colorado and Indiana.

This strong industry opposition resulted in a two-year roller coaster ride through the California legislature and culminated in a squeaker of a vote — with a ban just barely being signed into law. This was a very public and bruising defeat for an industry that cares very deeply about how it is perceived and they finally saw the writing on the wall. When a federal microbead ban — based on California’s — was introduced, it had little to no public opposition.

While this is great news, it will take a couple of years for microbeads to leave store shelves. So in the interim, a quick glance at the label will tell you what you need to know. Steer clear of products containing “polyethylene” or “polypropylene.” Be aware that the major weakness of the microbead ban is that non rinse-off cosmetics, like makeup and lip gloss, are not covered. So double check that label before getting gussied up.

When it comes to plastic, consumer choice can be influential and it is always good to be better informed about the products you buy. But it is important to realize that consumer demand alone will not solve our plastic pollution problem. The entire system is stacked to prevent consumer choice. When enough plastic has been manufactured to coat our entire planet in plastic wrap, anything less than a complete paradigm shift is simply not good enough.

But as we’ve seen with the microbead ban, change can happen — and even grassroots organizers in California can defeat powerful interests and drive national change. States and local municipalities continue to lead the way and I urge you to get involved in any capacity you are able.

For more info, check out our plastics campaign to see how the Center is working to affect change


How Can I Tell if a Product Has Microbeads in it?

Fortunately, several months ago President Obama signed a new law that will phase microbeads out of cosmetic personal care products. For the most part, this was a very strong bill and it sailed through both houses of Congress in the political equivalent of a blink of an eye. Bizarro world? Opposite day? Whatever your explanation, it was definitely out of the ordinary.

How on earth did a clean piece of environmental legislation get through a conservative Congress so easily? As it has done so often in the past, the state of California led the way. A few states had enacted microbead bans prior to the federal ban, but it was California’s that drew the ire of industry by closing a critical loophole that was present in several other state bans including Illinois, Colorado and Indiana.

This strong industry opposition resulted in a two-year roller coaster ride through the California legislature and culminated in a squeaker of a vote — with a ban just barely being signed into law. This was a very public and bruising defeat for an industry that cares very deeply about how it is perceived and they finally saw the writing on the wall. When a federal microbead ban — based on California’s — was introduced, it had little to no public opposition.

While this is great news, it will take a couple of years for microbeads to leave store shelves. So in the interim, a quick glance at the label will tell you what you need to know. Steer clear of products containing “polyethylene” or “polypropylene.” Be aware that the major weakness of the microbead ban is that non rinse-off cosmetics, like makeup and lip gloss, are not covered. So double check that label before getting gussied up.

When it comes to plastic, consumer choice can be influential and it is always good to be better informed about the products you buy. But it is important to realize that consumer demand alone will not solve our plastic pollution problem. The entire system is stacked to prevent consumer choice. When enough plastic has been manufactured to coat our entire planet in plastic wrap, anything less than a complete paradigm shift is simply not good enough.

But as we’ve seen with the microbead ban, change can happen — and even grassroots organizers in California can defeat powerful interests and drive national change. States and local municipalities continue to lead the way and I urge you to get involved in any capacity you are able.

For more info, check out our plastics campaign to see how the Center is working to affect change


How Can I Tell if a Product Has Microbeads in it?

Fortunately, several months ago President Obama signed a new law that will phase microbeads out of cosmetic personal care products. For the most part, this was a very strong bill and it sailed through both houses of Congress in the political equivalent of a blink of an eye. Bizarro world? Opposite day? Whatever your explanation, it was definitely out of the ordinary.

How on earth did a clean piece of environmental legislation get through a conservative Congress so easily? As it has done so often in the past, the state of California led the way. A few states had enacted microbead bans prior to the federal ban, but it was California’s that drew the ire of industry by closing a critical loophole that was present in several other state bans including Illinois, Colorado and Indiana.

This strong industry opposition resulted in a two-year roller coaster ride through the California legislature and culminated in a squeaker of a vote — with a ban just barely being signed into law. This was a very public and bruising defeat for an industry that cares very deeply about how it is perceived and they finally saw the writing on the wall. When a federal microbead ban — based on California’s — was introduced, it had little to no public opposition.

While this is great news, it will take a couple of years for microbeads to leave store shelves. So in the interim, a quick glance at the label will tell you what you need to know. Steer clear of products containing “polyethylene” or “polypropylene.” Be aware that the major weakness of the microbead ban is that non rinse-off cosmetics, like makeup and lip gloss, are not covered. So double check that label before getting gussied up.

When it comes to plastic, consumer choice can be influential and it is always good to be better informed about the products you buy. But it is important to realize that consumer demand alone will not solve our plastic pollution problem. The entire system is stacked to prevent consumer choice. When enough plastic has been manufactured to coat our entire planet in plastic wrap, anything less than a complete paradigm shift is simply not good enough.

But as we’ve seen with the microbead ban, change can happen — and even grassroots organizers in California can defeat powerful interests and drive national change. States and local municipalities continue to lead the way and I urge you to get involved in any capacity you are able.

For more info, check out our plastics campaign to see how the Center is working to affect change


How Can I Tell if a Product Has Microbeads in it?

Fortunately, several months ago President Obama signed a new law that will phase microbeads out of cosmetic personal care products. For the most part, this was a very strong bill and it sailed through both houses of Congress in the political equivalent of a blink of an eye. Bizarro world? Opposite day? Whatever your explanation, it was definitely out of the ordinary.

How on earth did a clean piece of environmental legislation get through a conservative Congress so easily? As it has done so often in the past, the state of California led the way. A few states had enacted microbead bans prior to the federal ban, but it was California’s that drew the ire of industry by closing a critical loophole that was present in several other state bans including Illinois, Colorado and Indiana.

This strong industry opposition resulted in a two-year roller coaster ride through the California legislature and culminated in a squeaker of a vote — with a ban just barely being signed into law. This was a very public and bruising defeat for an industry that cares very deeply about how it is perceived and they finally saw the writing on the wall. When a federal microbead ban — based on California’s — was introduced, it had little to no public opposition.

While this is great news, it will take a couple of years for microbeads to leave store shelves. So in the interim, a quick glance at the label will tell you what you need to know. Steer clear of products containing “polyethylene” or “polypropylene.” Be aware that the major weakness of the microbead ban is that non rinse-off cosmetics, like makeup and lip gloss, are not covered. So double check that label before getting gussied up.

When it comes to plastic, consumer choice can be influential and it is always good to be better informed about the products you buy. But it is important to realize that consumer demand alone will not solve our plastic pollution problem. The entire system is stacked to prevent consumer choice. When enough plastic has been manufactured to coat our entire planet in plastic wrap, anything less than a complete paradigm shift is simply not good enough.

But as we’ve seen with the microbead ban, change can happen — and even grassroots organizers in California can defeat powerful interests and drive national change. States and local municipalities continue to lead the way and I urge you to get involved in any capacity you are able.

For more info, check out our plastics campaign to see how the Center is working to affect change


How Can I Tell if a Product Has Microbeads in it?

Fortunately, several months ago President Obama signed a new law that will phase microbeads out of cosmetic personal care products. For the most part, this was a very strong bill and it sailed through both houses of Congress in the political equivalent of a blink of an eye. Bizarro world? Opposite day? Whatever your explanation, it was definitely out of the ordinary.

How on earth did a clean piece of environmental legislation get through a conservative Congress so easily? As it has done so often in the past, the state of California led the way. A few states had enacted microbead bans prior to the federal ban, but it was California’s that drew the ire of industry by closing a critical loophole that was present in several other state bans including Illinois, Colorado and Indiana.

This strong industry opposition resulted in a two-year roller coaster ride through the California legislature and culminated in a squeaker of a vote — with a ban just barely being signed into law. This was a very public and bruising defeat for an industry that cares very deeply about how it is perceived and they finally saw the writing on the wall. When a federal microbead ban — based on California’s — was introduced, it had little to no public opposition.

While this is great news, it will take a couple of years for microbeads to leave store shelves. So in the interim, a quick glance at the label will tell you what you need to know. Steer clear of products containing “polyethylene” or “polypropylene.” Be aware that the major weakness of the microbead ban is that non rinse-off cosmetics, like makeup and lip gloss, are not covered. So double check that label before getting gussied up.

When it comes to plastic, consumer choice can be influential and it is always good to be better informed about the products you buy. But it is important to realize that consumer demand alone will not solve our plastic pollution problem. The entire system is stacked to prevent consumer choice. When enough plastic has been manufactured to coat our entire planet in plastic wrap, anything less than a complete paradigm shift is simply not good enough.

But as we’ve seen with the microbead ban, change can happen — and even grassroots organizers in California can defeat powerful interests and drive national change. States and local municipalities continue to lead the way and I urge you to get involved in any capacity you are able.

For more info, check out our plastics campaign to see how the Center is working to affect change



Comments:

  1. Pinabel

    Endless topic

  2. Jedediah

    Thanks for an explanation, the easier, the better...

  3. Malkree

    I had a similar situation. I soared for a long time over how to get out of the water dry. A friend said one decision, only something I rushed so abruptly to change everything that was acquired by back-breaking labor. Decided to be patient for now, to take a closer look? how it turns. What can I say? water wears away the stone. That's really, really so. I advise the author not to be sad. How is it in the song? "whole life ahead".

  4. Goltirg

    It doesn't make sense

  5. Kizshura

    I liked it ... I advise, for those who have not watched, take a look - you will not be able to use it

  6. Calbex

    Bravo, it seems to me, is the excellent phrase



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