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Plum fangipane tart recipe

Plum fangipane tart recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Pies and tarts
  • Sweet pies and tarts
  • Fruit pies and tarts
  • Plum tart

This plum frangipane tart can be made with prunes, which you fry in butter to soften, if fresh plums aren't available.

5 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 1 tart

  • Pastry
  • 250g plain flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 75g caster sugar
  • 100g cold butter, cut into small cubes
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 50ml water
  • Frangipane
  • 100g butter, softened
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 100g ground almonds
  • 8 large plums, stoned and cut into segments

MethodPrep:10min ›Ready in:10min

  1. Mix flour, salt and sugar together in a large bowl. Rub in the cold butter with your fingers until it looks like breadcrumbs. Add egg yolk and water; knead into a ball. Wrap pastry in cling film and cool in the fridge for at least 1 hour.
  2. Preheat the oven to 180 C / Gas 4.
  3. Beat 100g soft butter and 100g caster sugar together in a large bowl until light and fluffy. Add the egg and mix well. Mix in the ground almonds until well combined.
  4. Roll out the pastry and line a 23cm fluted tart tin; trim edges.
  5. Spread the frangipane over the pastry base. Arrange the prunes on top in a circular pattern.
  6. Bake the tart in the preheated oven for about 45 minutes or until the pastry is golden brown and the plums are soft.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(2)


How to Make Frangipane

Pre-bake tart shells according to package instructions. Cool completely. Once cool, spoon 1 teaspoon preserves into the bottom of each shell. Set aside.

Cream butter and sugar together for a few minutes until light and fluffy. Add almond flour and mix for a few more minutes, scraping sides and bottom of the bowl as needed. Beat in eggs, one at a time, beating until fully incorporated. Mix in flour, extracts, and salt.

Spoon frangipane into tart shells, filling about 3/4 full. (Note: You will have extra frangipane.) Scatter sliced almonds on top. Bake for 20&ndash25 minutes or until golden and filling is set. Cool on a wire rack.

Frangipane may be made ahead and stored, covered, in the refrigerator for 2 days.

Over the past few years, I&rsquove developed a minor obsession with The Great British Baking Show, or The Great British Bake Off as it&rsquos known across the pond. The bakers are lovely and real&mdashI truly want each of them to win and get a little teary-eyed when they&rsquore sent home. They&rsquore polite, they help each other, and they bake some things I&rsquove never heard of in my life.

One of these mysterious concoctions is frangipane. Although frangipane is Italian in origin, it will always have a British connotation to me since I first learned of it on The Great British Baking Show. I&rsquom not going to lie, one of the reasons it intrigued me so is that it&rsquos just so fun to say: fran-zhe-pan or fran-juh-peyn.

Frangipane is an almond cream that is typically found in tarts but also can be used as a croissant filling. Because it contains eggs, it must be baked. Frangipane is not interchangeable with marzipan or almond paste.

It bakes up moist and creamy, beautifully almond-scented.

To make it, start by creaming butter and sugar.

The key ingredient gets added next: almond flour. You could grind almonds yourself, but I find almond flour to be readily available these days. You can use almond flour made with or without the skins.

To this, you&rsquoll add eggs, a bit of flour, almond and vanilla extracts, and a pinch of salt. At this point, the frangipane is ready to use, or it can be covered and refrigerated for two days.

Frangipane tartlets are a lovely&mdashand easy&mdashway to use the frangipane, especially when using pre-made tart shells. You can find them in the freezer section of the grocery store.

Bake the tart shells according to package instructions. Fill the bottom of each with one teaspoon preserves or jam. Again, pre-made makes this recipe a breeze.

Top the jam-filled tarts with frangipane and scatter with sliced almonds.

Bake until golden and set.

Ah, frangipane. I think I love you.

Are there any Great British Baking Show bakes that you&rsquore curious about?


Recipe Summary

  • 6 tablespoons butter at room temperature
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 ⅓ cups all-purpose flour
  • ⅓ cup seedless raspberry or strawberry jam
  • 4 ounces almond paste
  • ⅓ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • ½ cup butter at room temperature
  • ½ teaspoon almond extract
  • ⅓ cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 (29 ounce) can pear halves, well drained

Prepare crust: With mixer at low speed, beat butter and sugar until light and fluffy add egg until blended. Add flour beat until blended. Grease 9-inch tart pan with removable bottom. Press dough into bottom and up sides of pan. Prick crust with fork. Spread bottom with jam. Refrigerate.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Prepare filling: With mixer at low speed, beat almond paste, sugar and egg. Add butter and almond extract beat until just blended. Add flour and baking powder beat well. Spoon mixture over jam in crust.

Arrange pear halves, cut-side down on mixture in crust. Bake 50 minutes until filling is set. Cool completely.


The Frangipane

Next, you prepare the almond Frangipane: a not-too-sweet filling traditionally made from ground almonds and used extensively in French baking to fill pies, such as the Classic Bourdaloue Tart (a recipe you can find in my cookbook ). or the traditional Galette des Rois . Frangipane requires basic pantry ingredients (butter, sugar, flour, eggs) along with a good quality almond flour.

When baking, the soft Frangipane filling will puff up, firm up and envelop the apricot quarters – making the tart look effortlessly clean and elegant.


Frangipane recipes

Take a combination of flour, sugar, eggs and butter then throw in a generous amount of almonds and voila – you have frangipane, one of the tastiest tart fillings in the world. In the UK it’s most famously associated with the Bakewell tart, but clever pastry chefs the world over have used it to flavour all sorts of sweet pastries and desserts. Our collection of frangipane recipes show just how versatile this tasty filling can be.

Get to grips with the classic frangipane filling with the Galvin brothers’ very summery Pear and summer fruit frangipane tart, or Adam Gray’s Raspberry Bakewell tart. Avoiding gluten? No problem – Victoria Glass has you covered with her Gluten-free Bakewell tart. Feel free to replace the ground almonds with other nuts, too Anna Hansen opts for pistachios in her Gooseberry, turmeric and pistachio frangipane tart, as does James Mackenzie in his beautiful Pistachio and raspberry Bakewell tart.

Frangipane on its own is nice enough, but it’s often paired with sweet fruit to cut through the richness of the ground nuts. Don’t just use it to fill tarts either – frangipane is just as suitable when added to cakes, pastries and pâtisserie.


Pear and Almond Frangipane Tart

One of my very favorite things about autumn, when it’s grey and blustery outside, fallen leaves skirling about rain-dampened streets: being safe and cozy indoors, with something baking in the oven, filling the place with warmth and the scent of spices and the promise of comfort food to provide a balm against the chill. It was just such a dismal rainy day yesterday, with the prospect of wet feet enough to keep me indoors, providing the perfect opportunity to make this tart I’ve had my eye on since I picked up some luscious-looking Anjous at the market.

This is a classic French tart: marvelously simple to make despite its deceptively complicated appearance, and a perfect showcase of its ingredients: pears, almonds, butter, sugar. The pears are poached in a sugar syrup laced with cinnamon sticks, lemon zest, and vanilla bean – the resulting fragrance is intoxicating and leaves you with some succulent pears to place in a frangipane-lined tart shell of pâte sablée.

Frangipane is nothing more than an almond cream that is baked, unlike pastry cream, but that description barely captures the marvelousness of this filling. In the oven, it turns into a glorious, puffy, golden cloud enveloping the fruit. Think of it as the cold-weather version of those summer fruit tarts with fresh berries on top of a layer of vanilla pastry cream. Here, the fruit is cushioned inside a rich, custardy, nutty filling – warm, sweet, and utterly satisfying. I first made frangipane in pastry school – we did a version with plums, and if the sight of 13 golden brown, fragrant tarts lined on a table does not make your mouth water, I don’t know what would! Frangipane is classically made with almonds, although you could make it with any nut – hazelnut and pistachio versions are popular – and of course, a multitude of fruits will find a happy home in this filling.

I should also mention that I have had a fondness for the word "frangipane" ever since I read about an imaginary Cafe Frangipane in wordsmith sui generis Karen Elizabeth Gordon’s Paris Out of Hand, a wildly imaginative and surrealistic romp through a Paris cobbled from her memories and imagination. If you are a fan of the absurdist dadaism of Max Ernst and Marcel Duchamp, or if you are a lover of clever wordplay (a entry for an imaginary Hôtel de Echecs is described as a haven for chess players and losers, the word "echecs" in French meaning both "chess" and "failure"), or if you just want to be able to say "I am one thirsty angel" (Je suis un ange vachement assoiffé) you should take a look at this unusual, intoxicating book.

My version of this pear tart is taken from Dorie Greenspan’s Baking: From My Home to Yours, which seems to be to have been enthusiastically received by numerous bloggers, myself included. What I like about her recipe is that her pâte sablée can be made in a flash and requires no rolling out – you can simply press into the tart tin and freeze for half an hour before baking. That means it is quite possible to make this tart in one day – almost on a whim! Although her poaching syrup is made of sugar and water with a bit of lemon, you can easily embellish this, as I did, with vanilla, cinnamon sticks, cloves, even peppercorns, to give your pears more of a kick. Plus, the leftover syrup can be used again – poached pears on their own make a lovely dessert – or perhaps as a base for some fancy cocktail?

I also used this opportunity to make the pâte sablée in my brand-spanking new Cuisinart 7-cup food processor – picked up on sale thanks to a great friend. My previous food processor being of the meager two-cup variety, which was capable of grinding a handful of nuts but not good for much else, I find myself delighted to report that making dough in a food processor is a breeze. Especially for dough recipes that require cutting in cold butter, I find the food processor much more efficient than a stand mixer. It’s also much prettier than my old processor – even though we’re desperately short of counter space at this point, I like seeing it all shiny and sparkly, standing at attention in its spot of honor.

A slice of this pear and almond frangipane tart makes for a cozy bite as darkness falls outside and you can watch the lights go on in windows all around. If I look across the bay, I can see the last rays of the setting sun reflecting off the homes in the Oakland hills, fiery jewels scattered across the green sweep of hillside, mirroring the stars just emerging in the sky above.

Pear and Almond Frangipane Tart

adapted from Dorie Greenspan’s Baking: From My Home to Yours

1/2 cup confectioner’s sugar

9 tablespoon butter, very cold, cut into small pieces

3 ripe medium pears (I used Anjou) – you only need 2 pears but I suggest having an extra one just in case you mess up a pear


How to Make It Ahead:

While this dessert does involve several components and steps, there are ways to prep it in advance and make the process more time-friendly.

  • Sweet Tart Dough – prepare and refrigerate the tart dough several days in advance (or freeze up to a month ahead and allow to thaw in the refrigerator before rolling out)
  • Poached Pears – pears can be poached several days in advance and kept in an airtight container in the fridge.
  • Frangipane Filling – frangipane comes together quickly and stores extremely well. Make it several days in advance and store it in the refrigerator until you’re ready to use it. It also freezes well, just be sure to transfer it to the refrigerator in advance and allow it to thaw completely before using.


Blueberry and frangipane galette

This recipe for a blueberry and frangipane galette comes from my second cookbook ‘Sweet’ and is a wonderfully quick and easy dessert, using either fresh or frozen blueberries. The almond-intense frangipane mixture provides a firm centre to this galette (tart), which is best served with fresh cream. You can use any berry that you fancy and it’s not outrageously sweet. Double up the filling and make an extra one if you need to serve more people as this makes enough for 2 greedy people and 4 less so. I add a splash of Grand Marnier®, but it isn’t essential. You could add a hit of grated orange zest if you prefer to keep things sober. Orange and blueberries are the best together.

I’m missing my blog so much! I’ve been back from my fantastical trip to Europe for 3 weeks and have been dying to share my photos but it’s taking me SO much longer to get through them, There were around 1000. I’ve been working on two big back to back client projects so I haven’t had much time to edit and blog. I’m also missing making recipes here so I thought I’d share this one from my book as a little wave hello.

Let me know if you make any of my recipes. Nothing makes me happier than seeing your creations. You can find me on Instagram @Drizzleanddip and twitter and Facebook.

Have a stunning weekend, and if you are in Cape Town, this is the perfect dessert to cosy up with while it’s raining tomorrow #justsaying


Plum fangipane tart recipe - Recipes

To make the pastry mix the flour and butter together to resemble breadcrumbs. Add the egg and bring together into a dough. Wrap in cling film and chill for 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes remove the pastry from the fridge and roll out onto a floured surface. Line a buttered 27cms fluted loose bottom tin with the pastry and trim the edges.

To make the frangipane filling, beat together the butter and sugar until white and fluffy then add the almonds and eggs. Mix to combine and spoon into the pastry case. Top with the pears and bake for 40 minutes.

Remove from the oven, spoon over the Armagnac and serve at room temperature with the cream.

Pre heat the oven to 180C.

To make the pastry mix the flour and butter together to resemble breadcrumbs. Add the egg and bring together into a dough. Wrap in cling film and chill for 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes remove the pastry from the fridge and roll out onto a floured surface. Line a buttered 27cms fluted loose bottom tin with the pastry and trim the edges.

To make the frangipane filling, beat together the butter and sugar until white and fluffy then add the almonds and eggs. Mix to combine and spoon into the pastry case. Top with the pears and bake for 40 minutes.

Remove from the oven, spoon over the Armagnac and serve at room temperature with the cream.

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Ingredients

Method

To make the pastry mix the flour and butter together to resemble breadcrumbs. Add the egg and bring together into a dough. Wrap in cling film and chill for 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes remove the pastry from the fridge and roll out onto a floured surface. Line a buttered 27cms fluted loose bottom tin with the pastry and trim the edges.

To make the frangipane filling, beat together the butter and sugar until white and fluffy then add the almonds and eggs. Mix to combine and spoon into the pastry case. Top with the pears and bake for 40 minutes.

Remove from the oven, spoon over the Armagnac and serve at room temperature with the cream.

Pre heat the oven to 180C.

To make the pastry mix the flour and butter together to resemble breadcrumbs. Add the egg and bring together into a dough. Wrap in cling film and chill for 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes remove the pastry from the fridge and roll out onto a floured surface. Line a buttered 27cms fluted loose bottom tin with the pastry and trim the edges.

To make the frangipane filling, beat together the butter and sugar until white and fluffy then add the almonds and eggs. Mix to combine and spoon into the pastry case. Top with the pears and bake for 40 minutes.

Remove from the oven, spoon over the Armagnac and serve at room temperature with the cream.


Pear Frangipane Tart

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Roll out dough into a 12-inch round on a lightly floured surface. Fit into a 10-inch tart pan with a removable bottom and fold over to make a double-thick edge. Roll rolling pin over edge of tart pan to trim dough, and pierce bottom of dough all over with a fork. Freeze until firm, about 15 minutes.

Cream butter and sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add egg, ground almonds, rum, almond extract, and flour beat until smooth. Spread the thick mixture evenly in chilled tart shell and refrigerate while preparing pears.

Remove cooled poached pears from poaching liquid and cut in half lengthwise, removing the core and stem. Reserve poaching liquid. Place each half, cut side down, on a cutting board, and cut crosswise into thin slices. Arrange sliced pear halves on frangipane filling around edge of tart, leaving space between each half, and place one half in center of tart. When arranging pears, try to "pull" slices toward center of tart, which will elongate pears a bit and fill the shell better than if the pears were just placed flat. Bake for 10 minutes, reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees, and bake until tart shell is golden brown and frangipane has puffed and browned, 25 to 35 minutes more.

While tart is baking, bring reserved poaching liquid to a boil and reduce by half. Brush this glaze lightly over pears immediately after removing tart from oven. Serve at room temperature.