New recipes

Woman Survives on an All-Emoji Diet for One Week

Woman Survives on an All-Emoji Diet for One Week


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

This woman decided to only eat foods that were represented by emoji and found that it was harder than she thought

This experiment has made us realize that so much of our everyday diet is not adequately represented by emoji, and this dire situation should be remedied as soon as possible.

Some people practically live in their smartphones, but this is taking it a bit too far. Atlantic writer Kelsey Rexroat recently undertook an “emoji diet.” During her week-long experiment she only ate foods represented by emoji (the Japanese picture characters available for smart phones). She quickly found out that her new diet was more difficult to maintain than she thought. Here’s a list of emoji we have noticed are sorely missing from the emoji keyboard: sandwiches, steak, chicken, yogurt, potatoes, fish, and most vegetables (except for corn and eggplant).

As a result of these limitations, this writer found out that eating digitally is tougher than she thought. She had three rules: she could only eat foods on the pre-approved emoji list, she had to eat all of the food represented, and she could combine and cook these foods to make them more enjoyable. Breakfast on the first day consisted of a fruit smoothie. She also tries some of the more traditional Japanese fare, like oden (a Japanese winter dish of boiled eggs, fishcakes and other ingredients), sticky rice balls, and ramen.

Her verdict? “The emoji diet hasn’t left me hungry or dissatisfied — if anything, my dessert binge has added some pounds — but it has slimmed down my wallet."

For the latest happenings in the food and drink world, visit our Food News page.

Joanna Fantozzi is an Associate Editor with The Daily Meal. Follow her on [email protected]


The most extreme weight loss methods revealed

Credit: Getty

Over the years, people have come up with some pretty extreme diets as a way to lose weight as quickly as possible.

It’s important to note that these are some of the most extreme diets ever recorded. They should not be followed and there are many safer, healthier, more sustainable and medically-approved diets to follow if you are looking to lose weight. Many people find great weight loss success with popular diets like the Sirtfood Diet and 16:8 fasting, or big-name weight loss programmes like Atkins and Weight Watchers.

Also, if you’re turning to extreme diets because you just can’t lose weight, the best thing to do it book an appointment with your GP and enlist the help of a personal trainer. Both will be able to put you on the right track to healthy, sustainable weight loss.


Woman survives on cheese sandwiches her whole life

A diet some could only dream of has turned into a cheesy nightmare for one British woman.

Her whole life, April Griffiths, 29, has eaten only cheese sandwiches — and on the rare occasion, potato chips — for breakfast, lunch and dinner, due to a severe anxiety condition that propels her into a panic attack every time she attempts to munch something new.

“The fear of choking and experiencing a different texture of food scares me,” the bubbly mother of two children tells Caters News Agency. “And even though I have tried to eat pea-size portions of rice, pasta or vegetables, I have never been able to swallow it without throwing up.”

So it’s purely grated cheese on bread, she says — preferably Mature Cheddar or Red Leicester. Griffiths can sometimes stomach basic sliced cheese or sour cream and onion Pringles on special occasions.

“I would love to eat a roast dinner, but I couldn’t face it — the vegetables, potatoes and meat all touching makes me feel sick,” she says.

The phobia began when she was a baby, she says. Her parents tried to transition her from milk to solid food but she would become extremely anxious or vomit immediately. They took her to the doctor, who said at the time there wasn’t anything medically wrong with her.

And, now that she and her husband, Leigh Kendall, are raising their own children, ages 8 months and 2 years old, she hopes they won’t adopt her behavior. She even eats in another room so her kids won’t see.

For the record, she says doctors tell her she’s otherwise healthy. She insists that she gets all the vitamins she needs from orange juice (“I drink three large cartons a day,” she says). But the mental toll it’s taking on her has been a challenge.

“I am genuinely scared of food and always have been,” she says.

The Post reached out to a nutritionist for comment about potential risk factors of this cheese-driven diet, but didn’t immediately hear back.

Meanwhile, Griffiths says she once came close to conquering her fear of other foods through expensive hypnotherapy — during which she was able to eat rice. But it’s not something she can afford on a regular basis.

“Even with years of counseling, I am unable to overcome my phobia,” she says.

And on top of that, it’s taken all the fun out of what’s a comfort food for most people.

“I am bored of cheese sandwiches,” she says. “I think this will be my diet for the rest of my life.”


After Years Of Neglecting Her Health, She Took Charge and Lost 150 Pounds

Adry Bella battled food addiction and struggled with her weight for years until one day in 2012, she noticed swelling on her legs and feet.

“Being in the medical field, I knew what those things meant and that I had to make a change immediately,” Adry explained.

At the time, she weighed 275 pounds.

She started experiencing excruciating pain

Not only did Adry experience painful swelling, but she also had constant headaches and excruciating back pain, that sometimes left her in tears.

She had neglected her health and body for a long time, admitting that Coke was her to-go drink at every meal and that she almost never drank water.

When I started seeing food as fuel and as eating to survive rather than living to eat, that’s when I committed.

Adry Bella in Daily Mail

When she finally decided to transform her life and break the cycle of neglect, she started by walking a mile several days a week, cutting out sugary foods, junk and drinking plenty of water.

The commitment paid off

Within the first month of her journey, Adry was down 15 pounds.

I had done enough damage to my body, so I owed myself the repair. I didn’t see my diet (health quest) as a sacrifice, I saw it as a road to recovery of an addiction I had developed with food.

Over the next 20 months, Adry lost 150 pounds naturally and remained consistent in her efforts to maintain a healthy weight and lifestyle, even after tragedy struck.

Sadly, Adry lost her first child, a daughter named Leah, in September 2015, after the baby was diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder during pregnancy.

It caused the baby girl’s kidneys and lungs not to develop properly and she passed away three days after she was born.

When she got pregnant again, she knew things had to change

As fate would have it, Adry became pregnant a second time and was determined to stay as healthy as possible.

To keep herself motivated, she took to Instagram to share with other women how she dealt with weight gain during her pregnancy.

The first three months of my pregnancy, energy level was at zero. I was fatigued, exhausted, and nauseated all day.

“With every week, my belly got heavier and bigger and running became impossible because I was cramping which meant I had to modify my workouts and weight lifting exercises.”

Adry stuck to healthy foods and gained 20 pounds during her pregnancy, and as difficult as it was at times, she was thrilled to start a new chapter of her life with her son.

When you fall, you get back up

She went back to her regular fitness routine after Amir was born in 2018 and fell in love with life all over again.

Then, last summer, Adry gave birth to her third child, Elliot, and she’s still working on dropping her baby weight, even if it’s a little more challenging this time around.

“I’m focused and proud that I am committed to get back without giving myself a time limit. I want to be happy, healthy, and strong for my boys,” she said.

“Don’t get me wrong, I’m dying to fit back into my size 3 jeans, but I will get there…just like I always have.”


Side Effects Of Eating A 900 Calorie Diet

Going below the recommended caloric intake has multiple side effects. Some of them include fatigue, constipation or diarrhea, nausea, a dry mouth, cramps, headaches, and dizziness, as well as feeling of extreme hunger ( 21 ). While these symptoms may disappear in a couple of weeks, some people will have more severe side effects, such as gallstones.

  • Gallstones . These are pieces of solid material that form in your gallbladder. When you do not eat enough, your body turns to burn fat as a source of energy. This forces the liver to secrete more cholesterol into bile, which then can form gallstones. Rapid weight loss puts you at a higher risk of gallstones ( 6 ).
  • Nutrient deficiencies . They occur when the body doesn’t absorb or get enough vitamins and minerals from food. These nutrients are crucial for both body development and preventing disease. Without them, we are at a higher risk of health issues such as digestive and eye problems, skin disorders, anemia, stunted or defective bone growth, dementia, and more ( 13 ).

Participating in very-low-calorie diets such as this one puts you at a higher risk of nutrient deficiencies. Since you are eating a very little amount of food, it is harder for you to eat many types of foods to give you all the nutrients that you require.


What to Expect

First, the bad news: Ditching carbs is no easy feat, especially if you ate a lot of carbs before. If you previously consumed a lot of sugary foods and beverages and refined foods, you're going to find it even more challenging. Many people report having hunger and food cravings — some intense — while their body adjusts, which can take one week or longer, depending on the person.

Other common effects of a low-carb meal plan include:

  • Headache
  • Bad breath
  • Weakness
  • Muscle cramps
  • Fatigue — mental and physical
  • Nausea
  • Skin rash
  • Constipation or diarrhea

This may happen the first day you quit carbs, or it may take a few days to develop. But chances are you will experience side effects for some part of your experiment with no carbs for a week. Typically, many of these side effects dissipate once your body adapts to the new diet. But, again, that depends on the person. Some people are more sensitive to carb deprivation and may have a more severe and longer-lasting reaction.

The good news is that you may experience weight loss of a few pounds in your first week, because weight loss tends to happen quickly at the beginning of a diet, according to an article published in March 2014 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. But weight loss depends largely on your calorie intake. It's a common misconception that if you give up carbs, you can eat anything else you want. As the 2018 JAMA study showed, weight loss may have nothing to do with abstaining from carbs, but with the overall nutritional value of your diet — and exercise.

A common mistake keto dieters make is thinking they can binge on high-fat foods because they're not eating carbs. Fat is high in energy, with 9 calories per gram, according to the USDA, while carbs and protein have 4 calories per gram. A diet higher in fat makes it easier to exceed your calorie goals, causing you to gain, not lose, weight. Even in one week, if you don't do the diet right, you could see the number on the scale go up instead of down.


OMAD tips and tricks (and knowing when to stop)

Fasting for 23 hours is not easy. Getting all your nutrition in one meal is even more challenging. And of course, your body can give you signals that it’s time to quit. Here are some tips to adjust to the OMAD diet and red flags to watch out for. Before you make any big changes to your diet and routine, talk to your doctor.

  • Make your one meal count: Make sure your meals are balanced, diverse and cover a full range of macro and micronutrients. Filling up too fast on one food group means missing out on the other nutrients you need. If you’re following a ketogenic diet in addition to an OMAD schedule, make sure to be mindful of your macros, and keep your large meal under your carbohydrate limit.
  • Fudge the timeline: OMAD also doesn’t need to be a strict 23:1 fasting:eating ratio. If it’s more comfortable for you to spread your large meal out over more than an hour, try it! If your body is screaming for food at hour 22 with major hangries after a big workout, go ahead and eat. It’s more important to maintain your composure and keep your life on track than it is to stick to a strict timeline.
  • Listen to your body: Even with balanced nutrients, some bodies simply don’t agree with extreme 23-hour fasting, and that’s okay. If you have a faster metabolism, frequently deal with mental stress or enjoy intense workouts, don’t force a schedule without listening to your body’s cues. If your body is stressed from fasting, it will release extra adrenaline and cortisol. If you have restless sleep or wake up unintentionally early, or if you’re feeling sluggish, weak or constantly tired, your body is telling you it needs more energy, more often.
  • Recognize when to stop: Pilon recommends using intermittent fasting infrequently because “the leaner you are, the less frequently [you need to fast] …You’ve accomplished what you’re trying to do. Now you’re basically fasting for health benefits and as a way to keep your weight in check.”
  • Transition out mindfully: Transitioning out of an OMAD schedule can pose its own problems as well. Restricting food all day can make you feel like you want to eat the biggest meal possible, as quickly as possible. But this mindset can do more harm than good, particularly if you binge on junk food or have a history of disordered eating. When you break your fast, fill your plate with nutrient-dense foods that support your health and wellness goals. If you’re struggling to balance nutrition and fasting, it’s okay to take a step back.
  • Women should pay extra attention: Studies show that intermittent fasting can mess with women’s insulin response. [9] Additionally, rodent studies show that fasting too much can cause the brain to suppress reproductive hormones. [10] If you notice negative changes in how you feel, or shifts in your cycle, see a doctor.
  • Fasting can cause more than just physical stress: Restricting yourself to one meal a day can also be taxing to your mind. Take care of your stress levels by practicing yoga, meditating, exercising or whatever helps you find your zen, and remember that more difficult fasts do not equal better results. Check in with yourself regularly to see if your schedule feels right, and remember that it’s okay to try different styles of fasting—or not fast at all.

The bottom line: Be Bulletproof on the OMAD and pay careful attention to your body. Make sure your meal provides all the daily nutrients you need. It’s okay to fudge the timing if you can’t make it to hour 23 or eat your whole meal in an hour. Above all, take care of yourself. Fasting is a tool to support your mind and body, but it’s not the only way to live a healthful life.


Eat Salad for Leanness

Packed with fiber, vitamins and antioxidants, salad is a perfect diet food. It's low in calories and can taste amazing — you just have to use the right ingredients. Leafy or iceberg lettuce, cabbage, kale, spinach, corn and tomatoes are all a great choice. Pair them with protein to stay full longer and boost your metabolism.

Going on a salad diet comes with its challenges, though. First of all, it can get boring in the long run. That's why it's important to mix and match ingredients, use herbs and spices and experiment with different recipes.

Second, eating just salad and protein may lead to nutrient deficiencies. Again, variety is the key. It's one thing to eat tuna salad at every meal and another thing to plan your meals ahead and add a twist to your favorite dishes.

For example, you can prepare a delicious tuna salad with cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, avocado, feta cheese, lettuce, red cabbage, onion, peppers, eggs, olive oil and vinegar. Add herbs like basil, oregano and parsley, plus a pinch of black pepper or chili powder. This dish provides more flavor and nutrition compared to classic tuna salad recipes.

Also, make sure you're getting enough protein. This nutrient helps preserve lean mass, increases satiety and raises energy expenditure, according to a review published in the British Journal of Nutrition in August 2012. As the American Council on Exercise points out, protein should account for 15 to 30 percent of your daily calorie intake. The more active you are, the higher your protein requirements.


Famous Ruth Bader Ginsburg quotes

It’s hard to overlook a woman with such a strong character and work ethic. Ginsburg continued to attend work throughout her chemotherapy sessions. She didn’t allow her illness nor others to decide her next move.

As serious as she was about everything she got involved into, Ruth also had a very good sense of humor. She proved that by approaching critical issues with humor and when she embraced the nickname ‘Notorious RBG’, stating that she and the famous rapper Notorious BIG had something in common — they were both born and raised in Brooklyn, NY.

Over the years, Ginsburg has delivered plenty of wisdom both inside and outside the courtroom. Below, you’ll find some of her most famous quotes.

Real change, enduring change, happens one step at a time.

When a thoughtless or unkind word is spoken, best tune out. Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade.

Fight for the things that you care about, but do it in a way that will lead others to join you.

I’m a very strong believer in listening and learning from others.

To make life a little better for people less fortunate than you, that’s what I think a meaningful life is. One lives not just for oneself but for one’s community.

You can disagree without being disagreeable.


My Week on the All-Emoji Diet

Tragedy may be an overstatement to apply to emoji, the standardized set of symbols used in texts and online messaging. But when the Unicode Consortium released an update this July expanding its library to include 250 new emoji, my coworker wasn’t the only one disappointed that the only new food is a chili pepper. A Change.org petition calls for a hot dog emoji, a Facebook page demanding a taco emoji has more than 1,000 likes, and thousands follow a Twitter account advocating for an avocado emoji .

As these foods continue to wait for emoji immortalization, I wondered why so many of my everyday foods lack a presence in computer text. Including the chili pepper, there are 59 food-themed emoji. What are they? How can they be assembled into recipes? And most importantly, could someone live on emoji alone ?

I had to know. I undertook a challenge:

For seven days, I would only eat foods represented by emoji.

I would eat every emoji food by the end of the seven days.

Some further specifications were needed. Though it can be argued that pigs, cows, and other emoji in Apple’s Nature category are food sources, I sacrificed bacon and stuck with the clearly defined foods grouped under Objects to avoid sliding down the “ technically edible ” slope. As I scoured New York for items such as oden and dango , I also learned about the origins of these tiny pictographs from Japan.

I start the first day of the diet by assessing the contents of my refrigerator. A breakfast smoothie uses bananas, milk (which I judge to be the bottle character) and strawberries, checking three items off the list already. Confidence sets in: This week will be a breeze.

I begin to make a list of what I plan to eat for the week, but some pictures prove hard to interpret. My confusion is cleared up with a visit to Emojipedia , which lists the symbols’ official names as designated by the Unicode Consortium. Some of the names give me more dietary leeway than I expected, such as the ambiguous “pot of food,” which I eat for lunch in the form of a vegetable stew. Others I’ve been misinterpreting all along—what I thought was rice and beans is actually curry, and the orange is technically a tangerine. I edit my list accordingly and stock up on fruits and veggies for the week.

All this produce is offset by a chocolate bar, cookie, and candies. I have a lollipop on my list as well, but this candy seems to have fallen out of modern favor. I can’t find one at two different grocery stores and have to make a special pilgrimage to F.A.O. Schwarz (famed for the oversized keyboard scene in the movie Big), where I find them stocked with other old-timey sugar relics. As I wait in line with my single lollipop, I suspect that I’m the only one there to fulfill a diet.

Dinner is spaghetti and red wine. It’s not a far stretch from my usual diet, though I have a moment of dismay when I realize there is no cheese emoji, and I must pass up the aged Gruyere I had bought a few days earlier.

Breakfast: coffee (“hot beverage”), banana, strawberries, milk lunch: veggie stew (“pot of food”), cherries, lollipop dinner: spaghetti, red wine.

I’m already scrounging for breakfast without my go-tos of yogurt, oatmeal, cereal, or bagels. After settling for an apple and green tea with honey, I decide to get more creative with lunch. I chop up roasted sweet potato, eggplant and tomato and combine it into an improvised emoji ratatouille, which suffices for a filling meal, especially supplemented with mid-afternoon chocolate.

For dinner, it’s time to face down my fear of the unknown: Specifically, the mystery brown shapes on a stick. I’m relieved to learn that though this emoji resembles some primitive meat-based weapon, it’s actually oden, a soul-food dish of varying ingredients such as eggs and fish cakes stewed in a dashi broth. Like many of the foods, it reflects emoji’s origins as a character set created for a Japanese phone operator in 1999. If Western users feel that the characters aren’t representative of their daily diets, it’s because they were never expected to catch on globally.

I use this opportunity to visit a neighborhood Japanese restaurant and order items I usually skim past due to unfamiliarity. My oden arrives in a bowl rather than on a stick, but I’m told that skewers are more typical of the street-food variety. The meal is rounded out with a carafe of sake and shaved ice with plum syrup.

Breakfast: green tea with honey (“honey pot”), red apple lunch: roasted sweet potato with eggplant (“aubergine”) and tomato, chocolate bar dinner: oden, fish cake, sake, shaved ice.

Thus far, I’ve made an effort to stay true to the emoji depictions of the food. Since my iPhone shows a chocolate glazed doughnut with sprinkles, that’s the variety I order for breakfast, even though someone on an Android or Windows operating system may see a different picture. The Unicode Consortium has standardized the characters descriptions, but emoji fonts—and the technology firms that, for now, are their only designers—are free to interpret those descriptions however they choose. (Android eschews the sprinkles.)

For lunch, I make my way to a bustling Japanese grocer and find neatly packaged rice balls for $1.50 each. It’s by far the cheapest lunch I’ve seen in this business district of $14 salads, which explains why the line to check out is 30 people deep. I devour the sticky rice stuffed with tuna and regret that it took an emoji to discover this place.

Since I’m usually goading my boyfriend into healthy dinners of salmon and quinoa, he’s thrilled when I suggest burgers and fries instead. We order at our local gastropub, and I wash it down with a fruity gin sling—since surely “tropical drink” means “tropical cocktail.”

Breakfast: coffee, doughnut, grapes lunch: rice ball, green apple, cookie dinner: hamburger, fries, tropical drink.

I’m still feeling bloated from yesterday’s starch fest, so I stick with a peach for breakfast and then make a healthy vegetable curry for lunch.

By evening, I’ve recovered and am ready for more greasy goodness. I’ve learned on emojitracker , which shows emoji usage on Twitter in real time, that pizza and beer are the most popular of the food emoji. Who am I to argue with millions of Twitter users? I pick up a six-pack on the way home from work and order in a pepperoni pizza. It’s over halfway through the week and I’ve had a different kind of alcohol every night—clearly the emoji diet is not for teetotalers.

Breakfast: green tea with lemon, peach lunch: curry and rice, watermelon dinner: pizza, beer.

Aside from Day 3’s rice-ball discovery, lunches have been a low point of the emoji diet. With sandwiches, soups, and salads all banned, there are few places I can join my coworkers during lunch breaks. I’m also missing Mexican food, a dietary staple since my days living in Texas.

By now, some friends have suggested ways I can cheat in order to expand my diet. One friend is particularly concerned that I can’t have tacos and attempts to draw me one with a series of slashes and underscores. However, simple emoticons like :) and more complex ASCII art are not interchangeable terms for emoji, as each emoji corresponds to a specific two-byte Unicode sequence. In lieu of tacos, I have breaded shrimp and a mid-afternoon ice cream cone. Dinner is sushi and rice, making this the most seafood-centric day of my diet.

Breakfast: coffee, fruit salad of watermelon, melon and pineapple lunch: fried shrimp, tangerine, soft ice cream dinner: sushi, cooked rice.

The emoji diet has had me eating more seafood and fresh fruit, which I welcome as healthy additions. But as I assess what I still need to cover in the final days, I notice two common themes: white rice and sugar.

This diet is essentially the opposite of Atkins. Of the 59 food emoji, eight incorporate rice, and 11 are desserts. One manages to be both—the colored balls on a stick are dango, sweet dumplings made from rice flour and often filled with red bean paste. I locate them at a Japanese food market in SoHo along with a sesame chicken bento box for lunch and rice crackers, a crispy snack food.

After a dinner of veggie ramen (the “steaming pot” emoji), I realize that I’m facing a problem most dieters have never experienced: I need to step up the dessert eating if I’m going to reach my goal. I still have to cross off custard, shortcake, ice cream, and birthday cake, so I stop by a couple shops to purchase the first three and then ride out the ensuing sugar rush.

Breakfast: green tea, fried egg (officially named “cooking,” but represented as an egg in a pan) lunch: bento box, dango, rice crackers dinner: ramen, custard, shortcake, ice cream.

It’s the last day, and I’m ready to wrap things up. The emoji diet hasn’t left me hungry or dissatisfied—if anything, my dessert binge has added some pounds—but it has slimmed down my wallet, since I’ve been making more food purchases as I avoid the majority of my pantry. I now have lots of recommendations for new food emoji, from my typical cooking staples like garlic, onion, and spinach to snacks like chips, cheese, and popcorn.

To celebrate my last emoji meal, I invite friends to join me at a new restaurant on my block, and we gorge on the final items on my list with a meal that manages to be as true to emoji as it is to Southern home-style cooking: ribs (“meat on bone”), fried chicken (“poultry leg”), corn on the cob (“ear of maize”) and biscuits (“bread”).

The final remaining food is birthday cake, since my attempts to crash a birthday party this week failed. With only a few hours until midnight, we procure a cupcake, stick a candle in it, and look up which celebrities are celebrating their birthdays today. My week of emoji eating ends in a way that deserves some smiley faces, or at least a thumbs up: with us toasting martini glasses and singing “Happy Birthday” to Tom Hanks.

Breakfast: coffee, banana lunch: ramen leftovers, pear, candy dinner: ribs (“meat on bone”), poultry leg, ear of maize, bread, birthday cake, martini (“cocktail glass”).

So is the emoji diet a contender in the weight-loss market? Not likely, given its emphasis on white rice, alcohol, and indulging in a dessert (or three) each day. I did, however, enjoy exploring new foods and restaurants as I undertook my phone-food mission. I won’t be limiting myself to emoji again, but I will be eagerly watching to see which foods are added in future releases.

For now, you can find me on Team Sandwich.

More From The Atlantic

UPDATE 1-Britain probing AstraZeneca-Alexion deal over competition concerns

Britain probing AstraZeneca-Alexion deal over competition concerns

Oil Holds Gains as Robust Demand Seen Absorbing Iranian Barrels

China Stocks Surge to Highest Since March on Consumer Rally

German Lockdowns Damaged Consumer Spending at Start of 2021

Huawei plans to launch new operating system for phones in June

China's Huawei Technologies said it will launch its new Harmony operating system for smartphones on June 2, its biggest move yet aimed at recovering from the damage done by U.S. sanctions to its mobile phone business. U.S. sanctions banned Google from providing technical support to new Huawei phone models and access to Google Mobile Services, the bundle of developer services upon which most Android apps are based. The new HarmonyOS will only go some way to mitigating the impact of the 2019 sanctions that also barred Huawei from accessing critical U.S.-origin technology, impeding its ability to design its own chips and source components from outside vendors.

Boom in China Firms Listing in the U.S. Comes to Sudden Halt

(Bloomberg) -- At least three Chinese companies have put their plans to list in the U.S. on hold, heralding a slowdown in what’s been a record start to a year for initial public offerings by mainland and Hong Kong firms.A bike-sharing platform, a podcaster and a cloud computing firm are among popular Chinese corporates holding off plans for a U.S. float, put off by recent market declines, souring investor sentiment toward fast-growth companies and lackluster debuts by peers like Waterdrop Inc.Hello Inc., Ximalaya Inc. and Qiniu Ltd. are postponing plans to take orders from investors, even though the three had filed paperwork with the Securities and Exchange Commission well over two weeks ago. In the U.S., companies can kick off their roadshows two weeks after filing publicly and most typically stick to that timetable.“The recent broad market selloff, combined with the correction of the IPO market since the beginning of last month when some new issuers tanked during their debuts, may make the market conditions less predictable for newcomers who are ‘physically’ ready -- meaning they have cleared all regulatory hurdles for IPO -- to get out of the door,” said Stephanie Tang, head of private equity for Greater China at law firm Hogan Lovells. “Some participants may choose to monitor the market for more stable conditions.”The delays throw a wrench in a listings flood by Chinese and Hong Kong companies in the U.S. that already reached $7.1 billion year-to-date -- the fastest pace on record -- after booming in 2020. Demand for IPOs surged as a wave of global stimulus money, ultra-low interest rates and rallying stock markets lured investors despite Sino-American tensions and the continued risk of mainland stocks being kicked off U.S. exchanges.READ: Stock Market’s Million Little Dramas Come Down to a Supply GlutThe S&P 500 Index capped its biggest two-week slide since February on Friday amid mounting investor concern over inflation and its impact on tech and other growth stocks. China’s CSI 300 Index remains in a technical correction, having fallen 10% from a February peak, while the Nasdaq Golden Dragon China Index, which tracks Chinese companies listed in the U.S., has slumped more than 30% from its high that month.Waiting OnHello, which offers a bike-sharing platform plus electric scooters for sale, has delayed its planned launch and is still undecided on its prospective valuation given rising investor caution about new shares, Bloomberg News has reported. It had been planning to raise between $500 million and $1 billion in the offering, although the final number will depend on valuations, according to one person with knowledge of the matter.Online podcast and radio services startup Ximalaya and enterprise cloud services provider Qiniu have put their listings on hold after beginning to gauge investor interest at the end of April, people with knowledge of the matter said, asking not to be identified as the information isn’t public.The sounding out of investors, or pre-marketing process, generally comes after filing for an IPO and before formal order-taking in a roadshow. Hello declined to comment while Qiniu didn’t immediately respond to an emailed request for comment. Ximalaya’s IPO process is ongoing and the company will seek public listing at an appropriate time depending on market conditions, it said in response to questions.Weak DebutsThe poor performance of recent Chinese debutants has also sapped investor confidence. Insurance tech firm Waterdrop has plunged 38% from its offer price since going public earlier this month. Onion Global Ltd., a lifestyle brand platform, has fallen more than 8% below its IPO price.In fact, almost 59% or specifically 20 of the 34 Chinese firms that have listed in the U.S. this year are under water, data compiled by Bloomberg show, among them the two largest IPOs -- e-cigarette maker RLX Technology Inc. and online Q&A site Zhihu Inc. Of the ones that listed in 2020, just 40% are trading below their IPO prices.The recent volatility in global markets has spooked U.S. companies as well. They have also been delaying floats or facing weak debuts.For some, the current challenges faced by Chinese listing hopefuls are likely to be transitory, with the hotly-anticipated IPO of ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing Inc., which has filed confidentially for a multibillion-dollar offering, set to prove the real test of investor appetite for the China story.Apart from Hello and the two other firms that are said to delay IPO plans after kicking off their pre-marketing process, Chinese road freight transport platform ForU Worldwide Inc., which filed for a U.S. offering on May 13, and online education company Zhangmen Education Inc., which filed on May 19, are waiting in the wings though they have yet to pass the two-week hallmark.“There is a natural strong growth in China which international investors will still want to invest in over the longer term,” said Gary Dugan, chief executive officer at the Global CIO Office in Singapore.(Updates prices throughout, adds more details in the second-last paragraph.)More stories like this are available on bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

AdPlace A Bag On Your Car Mirror When Traveling

Brilliant Car Cleaning Hacks Local Dealers Wish You Didn’t Know

PG&E to Sell San Francisco Headquarters for $800 Million

(Bloomberg) -- PG&E Corp. has reached a deal to sell its iconic San Francisco headquarters to real estate joint-venture Hines Atlas for $800 million as the utility giant moves to cut costs after it emerged from bankruptcy last year.PG&E, which plans to move to Oakland next year, needs approval from state regulators to sell the 1.7 million-square-foot (158,000-square-meter) complex, which includes 77 Beale Street and 245 Market Street, according to a statement Monday.The sale comes as office markets around the globe have been battered by the coronavirus pandemic. One broker estimated in 2019 that PG&E’s headquarters could bring in more than $1 billion. The utility giant is one of the most high-profile companies to leave San Francisco for Oakland, a less expensive city located across San Francisco Bay.Nearly a dozen bids were submitted for the property, according to a person familiar with the matter. That level of interest suggests real estate investors are willing to bet on a rebound for office demand in the city.“It’s a fantastic bet on San Francisco,” said J.D. Lumpkin, executive managing director at commercial real estate brokerage Cushman & Wakefield in San Francisco, who wasn’t involved in the deal. “While San Francisco has taken its lumps through Covid, perhaps more than other cities, there’s a lot of evidence that we will rebound over the next two or three years.”PG&E didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment about the bids. The company’s shares rose as much as 2.1% Monday.Unlike some other large property sales in San Francisco since the pandemic, the complex will require a substantial amount of renovation. It also doesn’t have a tenant in place, so the buyers will have to fill it in a few years once the redevelopment is finished.Also See: KKR Said to Buy $1.08 Billion San Francisco Dropbox OfficesSan Francisco’s overall office vacancy rate in the first quarter shattered the previous record high hit during the dot-com bust at the turn of the century, according to CBRE Group Inc. That’s pushed rent down and weighed on the value of buildings.The sale price is about $200 million less than expected, Citigroup Inc. utility analyst Ryan Levine wrote in a research note Monday. That raises the prospect that PG&E may need to raise equity this year, he said.Offset BillsPG&E intends to distribute about $400 million from its gain on the sale to customers over five years to offset bill increases as it invests in safety and operational improvements. In an added benefit, most PG&E workers will have shorter commutes to their new office, the company said.CBRE’s San Francisco Capital Markets team brokered the deal.PG&E filed for bankruptcy in early 2019 after collapsing under liabilities from wildfires sparked by its equipment. Though the company exited Chapter 11 last year, it remains burdened by about $42 billion of debt, raising concerns about its financial durability and ability to make the investments required to fire-proof its grid.Hines is one of the biggest private real estate investors and managers in the world, according to its website. Hines Atlas is a joint venture between Hines and another investor, a Hines spokesman said. He declined to name the other investor.(Adds details of bid beginning in fourth paragraph.)More stories like this are available on bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

Singapore’s Richest Property Family Warns of Cooling Measures

(Bloomberg) -- The Singapore government may step in to introduce property curbs if home prices keep rising, according to the city-state’s richest property family, marking the first time a developer has waded in on the issue.City Developments Ltd. Chairman Kwek Leng Beng “noted that the residential market has been performing well though he cautioned that if property prices continue to rise, there may be a time that further cooling measures could be introduced to control the prices,” records from the company’s annual shareholder meeting show. The gathering was held on April 30, with the notes filed at the Singapore Exchange on Monday.Singapore’s property market has rebounded sharply in recent months, making the sector a bright spot as the economy recovers from the pandemic. Prices of properties ranging from public apartments to private units and luxury bungalows have been rising, with some hitting records.That has prompted growing speculation that authorities may take steps to calm the market and prevent it from running ahead of the economy. But a recent Covid-19 outbreak may test the market’s resilience as the city-state returns to lockdown-like conditions last imposed a year ago.At the shareholder meeting, Chief Executive Officer Sherman Kwek expressed optimism about the prospects of CDL’s residential projects and office properties in Singapore.The number of home units sold in the city-state has recovered to a healthy level despite the pandemic, said Kwek, who is the chairman’s son. Transaction volume last year equaled that of 2019, with close to 10,000 units sold for the entire market. And there’s still pent-up demand, especially among buyers who are upgrading from public to private apartments, he said.“While there is uncertainty surrounding whether the government would implement new cooling measures, the overall residential market remains very stable,” the notes said, citing the CEO’s comments.More stories like this are available on bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

Stocks Move Higher As Bullish Momentum Remains Strong

Meanwhile, cryptocurrencies rebound after weekend sell-off.

NVIDIA Split Announcement Raises Red Flag

The systems chip manufacturer announced a four-for-one stock split on Friday morning, effective on July 20th.

Singapore clears LSE deal for Refinitiv after FX pledge

Singapore's competition authority has approved the London Stock Exchange Group's $27 billion acquisition of data and analytics company Refinitiv provided the bourse continues to offer certain foreign exchange benchmarks to rivals. The Competition and Consumer Commission of Singapore (CCCS)gave the conditional approval after examining whether the deal, which transforms the 300 year old bourse into a one-stop shop for data, trading and analytics, threatened competition in the currency market. The LSE has committed to making Refinitiv's WM/Reuters foreign exchange benchmarks available to existing and future customers to provide index licencing services or clearing services in Singapore, CCCS said in a statement, adding that the commitment, effective from Monday, was for 10 years.

First Warning Sign in Global Commodity Boom Flashes in China

(Bloomberg) -- One pillar of this year’s blistering commodities rally -- Chinese demand -- may be teetering.Beijing aced its economic recovery from the pandemic largely via an expansion in credit and a state-aided construction boom that sucked in raw materials from across the planet. Already the world’s biggest consumer, China spent $150 billion on crude oil, iron ore and copper ore alone in the first four months of 2021. Resurgent demand and rising prices mean that’s $36 billion more than the same period last year.With global commodities rising to record highs, Chinese government officials are trying to temper prices and reduce some of the speculative froth that’s driven markets. Wary of inflating asset bubbles, the People’s Bank of China has also been restricting the flow of money to the economy since last year, albeit gradually to avoid derailing growth. At the same time, funding for infrastructure projects has shown signs of slowing.Economic data for April suggest that both China’s economic expansion and its credit impulse -- new credit as a percentage of GDP -- may already have crested, putting the rally on a precarious footing. The most obvious impact of China’s deleveraging would fall on those metals keyed to real estate and infrastructure spending, from copper and aluminum, to steel and its main ingredient, iron ore.“Credit is a major driver for commodity prices, and we reckon prices peak when credit peaks,” said Alison Li, co-head of base metals research at Mysteel in Shanghai. “That refers to global credit, but Chinese credit accounts for a big part of it, especially when it comes to infrastructure and property investment.”But the impact of China’s credit pullback could ripple far and wide, threatening the rally in global oil prices and even China’s crop markets. And while tighter money supply hasn’t stopped many metals hitting eye-popping levels in recent weeks, some, like copper, are already seeing consumers shying away from higher prices.“The slowdown in credit will have a negative impact on China’s demand for commodities,” said Hao Zhou, senior emerging markets economist at Commerzbank AG. “So far, property and infrastructure investments haven’t shown an obvious deceleration. But they are likely to trend lower in the second half of this year.”A lag between the withdrawal of credit and stimulus from the economy and its impact on China’s raw material purchases may mean that markets haven’t yet peaked. However, its companies may eventually soften imports due to tighter credit conditions, which means the direction of the global commodity market will hinge on how much the recovery in economies including the U.S. and Europe can continue to drive prices higher.Some sectors have seen policy push an expansion in capacity, such as Beijing’s move to grow the country’s crude oil refining and copper smelting industries. Purchases of the materials needed for production in those sectors may continue to see gains although at a slower pace.One example of slowing purchases is likely to be in refined copper, said Mysteel’s Li. The premium paid for the metal at the port of Yangshan has already hit a four-year low in a sign of waning demand, and imports are likely to fall this year, she said.At the same time, the rally in copper prices probably still has a few months to run, according to a recent note from Citigroup Inc., citing the lag between peak credit and peak demand. From around $9,850 a ton now, the bank expects copper to reach $12,200 by September.It’s a dynamic that’s also playing out in ferrous metals markets.“We’re still at an early phase of tightening in terms of money reaching projects,” said Tomas Gutierrez, an analyst at Kallanish Commodities Ltd. “Iron ore demand reacts with a lag of several months to tightening. Steel demand is still around record highs on the back of the economic recovery and ongoing investments, but is likely to pull back slightly by the end of the year.”For agriculture, credit tightening may only affect China’s soaring crop imports around the margins, said Ma Wenfeng, an analyst at Beijing Orient Agribusiness Consultant Co. Less cash in the system could soften domestic prices by curbing speculation, which may in turn reduce the small proportion of imports handled by private firms, he said.The wider trend is for China’s state-owned giants to keep importing grains to cover the nation’s domestic shortfall, to replenish state reserves and to meet trade deal obligations with the U.S.No DisasterMore broadly, Beijing’s policy tightening doesn’t spell disaster for commodities bulls. For one, the authorities are unlikely to accelerate deleveraging from this point, according the latest comments from the State Council, China’s cabinet.“Internal guidance from our macro department is that the country won’t tighten credit too much -- they just won’t loosen further,” said Harry Jiang, head of trading and research at Yonggang Resouces, a commodity trader in Shanghai. “We don’t have many concerns over credit tightening.”And in any case, raw materials markets are no longer almost entirely in thrall to Chinese demand.“In the past, the inflection point of industrial metal prices often coincides with that of China’s credit cycle,” said Larry Hu, chief China economist at Macquarie Group Ltd. “But that doesn’t mean it will be like that this time too, because the U.S. has unleashed much larger stimulus than China, and its demand is very strong.”Hu also pointed to caution among China’s leaders, who probably don’t want to risk choking off their much-admired recovery by sharp swings in policy.“I expect China’s property investment will slow down, but not by too much,” he said. “Infrastructure investment hasn’t changed too much in the past few years, and won’t this year either.”Additionally, China has been pumping up consumer spending as a lever for growth, and isn’t as reliant on infrastructure and property investment as it used to be, said Bruce Pang, head of macro and strategy research at China Renaissance Securities Hong Kong. The disruption to global commodities supply because of the pandemic is also a new factor that can support prices, he said.Other policy priorities, such as cutting steel production to make inroads on China’s climate pledges, or boosting the supply of energy products, whether domestically or via purchases from overseas, are other complicating factors when it comes to assessing import demand and prices for specific commodities, according to analysts.(Updates copper price in 11th paragraph.)More stories like this are available on bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

Lim family's global assets on radar after Singapore court move

SINGAPORE (Reuters) -A Singapore court has approved a freeze on up to $3.5 billion of assets of the family behind collapsed Hin Leong Trading Pte Ltd, boosting the prospect of debt recovery from the former oil trading empire that counts some of the world's biggest banks among its creditors. Hin Leong was wound up in March after failing in a year-long effort to restructure more than $3 billion in debts after the COVID-19-led oil crash laid bare huge losses. Founder Lim Oon Kuin admitted in a court document last year to directing the company not to disclose hundreds of millions of dollars in losses over several years.

St. Louis Fed's Bullard: Most cryptocurrencies are 'worthless'

St. Louis Fed President James Bullard told Yahoo Finance that among the thousands of private cryptocurrencies out there, 'most of them are worthless.'


My Week Eating Only Food Represented by Emoji

Tragedy may be an overstatement to apply to emoji, the standardized set of symbols used in texts and online messaging. But when the Unicode Consortium released an update this July expanding its library to include 250 new emoji, my co-worker wasn’t the only one disappointed that the only new food is a chili pepper. A Change.org petition calls for a hot dog emoji, a Facebook page demanding a taco emoji has more than 1,000 likes, and thousands follow a Twitter account advocating for an avocado emoji.

As these foods continue to wait for emoji immortalization, I wondered why so many of my everyday foods lack a presence in computer text. Including the chili pepper, there are 59 food-themed emoji. What are they? How can they be assembled into recipes? And most importantly, could someone live on emoji alone?

I had to know. I undertook a challenge:

For seven days, I would eat only foods represented by emoji.

I would eat every emoji food by the end of the seven days.

Some further specifications were needed. Though it can be argued that pigs, cows, and other emoji in Apple’s Nature category are food sources, I sacrificed bacon and stuck with the clearly defined foods grouped under Objects to avoid sliding down the “technically edible” slope. As I scoured New York for items such as oden and dango, I also learned about the origins of these tiny pictographs from Japan.

Day One
I start the first day of the diet by assessing the contents of my refrigerator. A breakfast smoothie uses bananas, milk (which I judge to be the bottle character), and strawberries, checking three items off the list already. Confidence sets in: This week will be a breeze.

I begin to make a list of what I plan to eat for the week, but some pictures prove hard to interpret. My confusion is cleared up with a visit to Emojipedia, which lists the symbols’ official names as designated by the Unicode Consortium. Some of the names give me more dietary leeway than I expected, such as the ambiguous “pot of food,” which I eat for lunch in the form of a vegetable stew. Others I’ve been misinterpreting all along — what I thought was rice and beans is actually curry, and the orange is technically a tangerine. I edit my list accordingly and stock up on fruits and veggies for the week.

Day One’s produce-shopping bounty. (Kelsey Rexroat)

All this produce is offset by a chocolate bar, cookie, and candies. I have a lollipop on my list as well, but this candy seems to have fallen out of modern favor. I can’t find one at two different grocery stores and have to make a special pilgrimage to FAO Schwarz (famed for the oversized keyboard scene in the movie Big), where I find them stocked with other old-timey sugar relics. As I wait in line with my single lollipop, I suspect that I’m the only one there to fulfill a diet.

Dinner is spaghetti and red wine. It’s not a far stretch from my usual diet, though I have a moment of dismay when I realize there is no cheese emoji, and I must pass up the aged Gruyere I had bought a few days earlier.

Breakfast: coffee (“hot beverage”), banana, strawberries, milk lunch: veggie stew (“pot of food”), cherries, lollipop dinner: spaghetti, red wine.

Day Two
I’m already scrounging for breakfast without my go-tos of yogurt, oatmeal, cereal, or bagels. After settling for an apple and green tea with honey, I decide to get more creative with lunch. I chop up roasted sweet potato, eggplant, and tomato and combine it into an improvised emoji ratatouille, which suffices for a filling meal, especially supplemented with mid-afternoon chocolate.

Day Two: oden, sake. (Kelsey Rexroat)

For dinner, it’s time to face down my fear of the unknown: Specifically, the mystery brown shapes on a stick. I’m relieved to learn that, though this emoji resembles some primitive meat-based weapon, it’s actually oden, a soul-food dish of varying ingredients such as eggs and fish cakes stewed in a dashi broth. Like many of the foods, it reflects emoji’s origins as a character set created for a Japanese phone operator in 1999. If Western users feel that the characters aren’t representative of their daily diets, it’s because they were never expected to catch on globally.

I use this opportunity to visit a neighborhood Japanese restaurant and order items I usually skim past due to unfamiliarity. My oden arrives in a bowl rather than on a stick, but I’m told that skewers are more typical of the street-food variety. The meal is rounded out with a carafe of sake and shaved ice with plum syrup.

Breakfast: green tea with honey (“honey pot”), red apple lunch: roasted sweet potato with eggplant (“aubergine”) and tomato, chocolate bar dinner: oden, fish cake, sake, shaved ice.

Day Three
Thus far, I’ve made an effort to stay true to the emoji depictions of the food. Since my iPhone shows a chocolate glazed doughnut with sprinkles, that’s the variety I order for breakfast, even though someone on an Android or Windows operating system may see a different picture. The Unicode Consortium has standardized the characters descriptions, but emoji fonts — and the technology firms that, for now, are their only designers — are free to interpret those descriptions however they choose. (Android eschews the sprinkles.)

Hamburger and fries for dinner on Day Three. (Rexroat)

For lunch, I make my way to a bustling Japanese grocer and find neatly packaged rice balls for $1.50 each. It’s by far the cheapest lunch I’ve seen in this business district of $14 salads, which explains why the line to check out is 30 people deep. I devour the sticky rice stuffed with tuna and regret that it took an emoji to discover this place.

Since I’m usually goading my boyfriend into healthy dinners of salmon and quinoa, he’s thrilled when I suggest burgers and fries instead. We order at our local gastropub, and I wash it down with a fruity gin sling — since surely “tropical drink” means “tropical cocktail.”

Breakfast: coffee, doughnut, grapes lunch: rice ball, green apple, cookie dinner: hamburger, fries, tropical drink.

Day Four
I’m still feeling bloated from yesterday’s starch fest, so I stick with a peach for breakfast and then make a healthy vegetable curry for lunch.

By evening, I’ve recovered and am ready for more greasy goodness. I’ve learned on emojitracker, which shows emoji usage on Twitter in real time, that pizza and beer are the most popular of the food emoji. Who am I to argue with millions of Twitter users? I pick up a six-pack on the way home from work and order in a pepperoni pizza. It’s over halfway through the week and I’ve had a different kind of alcohol every night — clearly the emoji diet is not for teetotalers.

Breakfast: green tea with lemon, peach lunch: curry and rice, watermelon dinner: pizza, beer.

Day Five
Aside from Day Three’s rice-ball discovery, lunches have been a low point of the emoji diet. With sandwiches, soups, and salads all missing, there are few places I can join my co-workers during lunch breaks. I’m also missing Mexican food, a dietary staple since my days living in Texas.

Dinner, Day Five. (Kelsey Rexroat)

By now, some friends have suggested ways I can cheat in order to expand my diet. One friend is particularly concerned that I can’t have tacos and attempts to draw me one with a series of slashes and underscores. However, simple emoticons like :) and more complex ASCII art are not interchangeable terms for emoji, as each emoji corresponds to a specific two-byte Unicode sequence. In lieu of tacos, I have breaded shrimp and a midafternoon ice cream cone. Dinner is sushi and rice, making this the most seafood-centric day of my diet.

Breakfast: coffee, fruit salad of watermelon, melon and pineapple lunch: fried shrimp, tangerine, soft ice cream dinner: sushi, cooked rice.

Day Six
The emoji diet has had me eating more seafood and fresh fruit, which I welcome as healthy additions. But as I assess what I still need to cover in the final days, I notice two common themes: white rice and sugar.

This diet is essentially the opposite of Atkins. Of the 59 food emoji, eight incorporate rice, and 11 are desserts. One manages to be both — the colored balls on a stick are dango, sweet dumplings made from rice flour and often filled with red bean paste. I locate them at a Japanese food market in SoHo, along with a sesame chicken bento box for lunch and rice crackers, a crispy snack food.

After a dinner of veggie ramen (the “steaming pot” emoji), I realize that I’m facing a problem most dieters have never experienced: I need to step up the dessert eating if I’m going to reach my goal. I still have to cross off custard, shortcake, ice cream, and birthday cake, so I stop by a couple of shops to purchase the first three and then ride out the ensuing sugar rush.

Breakfast: green tea, fried egg (officially named “cooking,” but represented as an egg in a pan) lunch: bento box, dango, rice crackers dinner: ramen, custard, shortcake, ice cream.

Day Seven
It’s the last day, and I’m ready to wrap things up. The emoji diet hasn’t left me hungry or dissatisfied — if anything, my dessert binge has added some pounds — but it has slimmed down my wallet, since I’ve been making more food purchases as I avoid the majority of my pantry. I now have lots of recommendations for new food emoji, from my typical cooking staples like garlic, onion, and spinach to snacks like chips, cheese, and popcorn.

To celebrate my last emoji meal, I invite friends to join me at a new restaurant on my block, and we gorge on the final items on my list with a meal that manages to be as true to emoji as it is to Southern home-style cooking: ribs (“meat on bone”), fried chicken (“poultry leg”), corn on the cob (“ear of maize”), and biscuits (“bread”).

The final remaining food is birthday cake, since my attempts to crash a birthday party this week failed. With only a few hours until midnight, we procure a cupcake, stick a candle in it, and look up which celebrities are celebrating their birthdays today. My week of emoji eating ends in a way that deserves some smiley faces, or at least a thumbs up: with us toasting martini glasses and singing “Happy Birthday” to Tom Hanks.

Breakfast: coffee, banana lunch: ramen leftovers, pear, candy dinner: ribs (“meat on bone”), poultry leg, ear of maize, bread, birthday cake, martini (“cocktail glass”).

So is the emoji diet a contender in the weight-loss market? Not likely, given its emphasis on white rice, alcohol, and indulging in a dessert (or three) each day. I did, however, enjoy exploring new foods and restaurants as I undertook my phone-food mission. I won’t be limiting myself to emoji again, but I will be eagerly watching to see which foods are added in future releases.

For now, you can find me on Team Sandwich.

More from The Atlantic

UPDATE 1-Britain probing AstraZeneca-Alexion deal over competition concerns

Britain probing AstraZeneca-Alexion deal over competition concerns

Oil Holds Gains as Robust Demand Seen Absorbing Iranian Barrels

China Stocks Surge to Highest Since March on Consumer Rally

German Lockdowns Damaged Consumer Spending at Start of 2021

Huawei plans to launch new operating system for phones in June

China's Huawei Technologies said it will launch its new Harmony operating system for smartphones on June 2, its biggest move yet aimed at recovering from the damage done by U.S. sanctions to its mobile phone business. U.S. sanctions banned Google from providing technical support to new Huawei phone models and access to Google Mobile Services, the bundle of developer services upon which most Android apps are based. The new HarmonyOS will only go some way to mitigating the impact of the 2019 sanctions that also barred Huawei from accessing critical U.S.-origin technology, impeding its ability to design its own chips and source components from outside vendors.

Boom in China Firms Listing in the U.S. Comes to Sudden Halt

(Bloomberg) -- At least three Chinese companies have put their plans to list in the U.S. on hold, heralding a slowdown in what’s been a record start to a year for initial public offerings by mainland and Hong Kong firms.A bike-sharing platform, a podcaster and a cloud computing firm are among popular Chinese corporates holding off plans for a U.S. float, put off by recent market declines, souring investor sentiment toward fast-growth companies and lackluster debuts by peers like Waterdrop Inc.Hello Inc., Ximalaya Inc. and Qiniu Ltd. are postponing plans to take orders from investors, even though the three had filed paperwork with the Securities and Exchange Commission well over two weeks ago. In the U.S., companies can kick off their roadshows two weeks after filing publicly and most typically stick to that timetable.“The recent broad market selloff, combined with the correction of the IPO market since the beginning of last month when some new issuers tanked during their debuts, may make the market conditions less predictable for newcomers who are ‘physically’ ready -- meaning they have cleared all regulatory hurdles for IPO -- to get out of the door,” said Stephanie Tang, head of private equity for Greater China at law firm Hogan Lovells. “Some participants may choose to monitor the market for more stable conditions.”The delays throw a wrench in a listings flood by Chinese and Hong Kong companies in the U.S. that already reached $7.1 billion year-to-date -- the fastest pace on record -- after booming in 2020. Demand for IPOs surged as a wave of global stimulus money, ultra-low interest rates and rallying stock markets lured investors despite Sino-American tensions and the continued risk of mainland stocks being kicked off U.S. exchanges.READ: Stock Market’s Million Little Dramas Come Down to a Supply GlutThe S&P 500 Index capped its biggest two-week slide since February on Friday amid mounting investor concern over inflation and its impact on tech and other growth stocks. China’s CSI 300 Index remains in a technical correction, having fallen 10% from a February peak, while the Nasdaq Golden Dragon China Index, which tracks Chinese companies listed in the U.S., has slumped more than 30% from its high that month.Waiting OnHello, which offers a bike-sharing platform plus electric scooters for sale, has delayed its planned launch and is still undecided on its prospective valuation given rising investor caution about new shares, Bloomberg News has reported. It had been planning to raise between $500 million and $1 billion in the offering, although the final number will depend on valuations, according to one person with knowledge of the matter.Online podcast and radio services startup Ximalaya and enterprise cloud services provider Qiniu have put their listings on hold after beginning to gauge investor interest at the end of April, people with knowledge of the matter said, asking not to be identified as the information isn’t public.The sounding out of investors, or pre-marketing process, generally comes after filing for an IPO and before formal order-taking in a roadshow. Hello declined to comment while Qiniu didn’t immediately respond to an emailed request for comment. Ximalaya’s IPO process is ongoing and the company will seek public listing at an appropriate time depending on market conditions, it said in response to questions.Weak DebutsThe poor performance of recent Chinese debutants has also sapped investor confidence. Insurance tech firm Waterdrop has plunged 38% from its offer price since going public earlier this month. Onion Global Ltd., a lifestyle brand platform, has fallen more than 8% below its IPO price.In fact, almost 59% or specifically 20 of the 34 Chinese firms that have listed in the U.S. this year are under water, data compiled by Bloomberg show, among them the two largest IPOs -- e-cigarette maker RLX Technology Inc. and online Q&A site Zhihu Inc. Of the ones that listed in 2020, just 40% are trading below their IPO prices.The recent volatility in global markets has spooked U.S. companies as well. They have also been delaying floats or facing weak debuts.For some, the current challenges faced by Chinese listing hopefuls are likely to be transitory, with the hotly-anticipated IPO of ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing Inc., which has filed confidentially for a multibillion-dollar offering, set to prove the real test of investor appetite for the China story.Apart from Hello and the two other firms that are said to delay IPO plans after kicking off their pre-marketing process, Chinese road freight transport platform ForU Worldwide Inc., which filed for a U.S. offering on May 13, and online education company Zhangmen Education Inc., which filed on May 19, are waiting in the wings though they have yet to pass the two-week hallmark.“There is a natural strong growth in China which international investors will still want to invest in over the longer term,” said Gary Dugan, chief executive officer at the Global CIO Office in Singapore.(Updates prices throughout, adds more details in the second-last paragraph.)More stories like this are available on bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

AdPlace A Bag On Your Car Mirror When Traveling

Brilliant Car Cleaning Hacks Local Dealers Wish You Didn’t Know

PG&E to Sell San Francisco Headquarters for $800 Million

(Bloomberg) -- PG&E Corp. has reached a deal to sell its iconic San Francisco headquarters to real estate joint-venture Hines Atlas for $800 million as the utility giant moves to cut costs after it emerged from bankruptcy last year.PG&E, which plans to move to Oakland next year, needs approval from state regulators to sell the 1.7 million-square-foot (158,000-square-meter) complex, which includes 77 Beale Street and 245 Market Street, according to a statement Monday.The sale comes as office markets around the globe have been battered by the coronavirus pandemic. One broker estimated in 2019 that PG&E’s headquarters could bring in more than $1 billion. The utility giant is one of the most high-profile companies to leave San Francisco for Oakland, a less expensive city located across San Francisco Bay.Nearly a dozen bids were submitted for the property, according to a person familiar with the matter. That level of interest suggests real estate investors are willing to bet on a rebound for office demand in the city.“It’s a fantastic bet on San Francisco,” said J.D. Lumpkin, executive managing director at commercial real estate brokerage Cushman & Wakefield in San Francisco, who wasn’t involved in the deal. “While San Francisco has taken its lumps through Covid, perhaps more than other cities, there’s a lot of evidence that we will rebound over the next two or three years.”PG&E didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment about the bids. The company’s shares rose as much as 2.1% Monday.Unlike some other large property sales in San Francisco since the pandemic, the complex will require a substantial amount of renovation. It also doesn’t have a tenant in place, so the buyers will have to fill it in a few years once the redevelopment is finished.Also See: KKR Said to Buy $1.08 Billion San Francisco Dropbox OfficesSan Francisco’s overall office vacancy rate in the first quarter shattered the previous record high hit during the dot-com bust at the turn of the century, according to CBRE Group Inc. That’s pushed rent down and weighed on the value of buildings.The sale price is about $200 million less than expected, Citigroup Inc. utility analyst Ryan Levine wrote in a research note Monday. That raises the prospect that PG&E may need to raise equity this year, he said.Offset BillsPG&E intends to distribute about $400 million from its gain on the sale to customers over five years to offset bill increases as it invests in safety and operational improvements. In an added benefit, most PG&E workers will have shorter commutes to their new office, the company said.CBRE’s San Francisco Capital Markets team brokered the deal.PG&E filed for bankruptcy in early 2019 after collapsing under liabilities from wildfires sparked by its equipment. Though the company exited Chapter 11 last year, it remains burdened by about $42 billion of debt, raising concerns about its financial durability and ability to make the investments required to fire-proof its grid.Hines is one of the biggest private real estate investors and managers in the world, according to its website. Hines Atlas is a joint venture between Hines and another investor, a Hines spokesman said. He declined to name the other investor.(Adds details of bid beginning in fourth paragraph.)More stories like this are available on bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

Singapore’s Richest Property Family Warns of Cooling Measures

(Bloomberg) -- The Singapore government may step in to introduce property curbs if home prices keep rising, according to the city-state’s richest property family, marking the first time a developer has waded in on the issue.City Developments Ltd. Chairman Kwek Leng Beng “noted that the residential market has been performing well though he cautioned that if property prices continue to rise, there may be a time that further cooling measures could be introduced to control the prices,” records from the company’s annual shareholder meeting show. The gathering was held on April 30, with the notes filed at the Singapore Exchange on Monday.Singapore’s property market has rebounded sharply in recent months, making the sector a bright spot as the economy recovers from the pandemic. Prices of properties ranging from public apartments to private units and luxury bungalows have been rising, with some hitting records.That has prompted growing speculation that authorities may take steps to calm the market and prevent it from running ahead of the economy. But a recent Covid-19 outbreak may test the market’s resilience as the city-state returns to lockdown-like conditions last imposed a year ago.At the shareholder meeting, Chief Executive Officer Sherman Kwek expressed optimism about the prospects of CDL’s residential projects and office properties in Singapore.The number of home units sold in the city-state has recovered to a healthy level despite the pandemic, said Kwek, who is the chairman’s son. Transaction volume last year equaled that of 2019, with close to 10,000 units sold for the entire market. And there’s still pent-up demand, especially among buyers who are upgrading from public to private apartments, he said.“While there is uncertainty surrounding whether the government would implement new cooling measures, the overall residential market remains very stable,” the notes said, citing the CEO’s comments.More stories like this are available on bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

Stocks Move Higher As Bullish Momentum Remains Strong

Meanwhile, cryptocurrencies rebound after weekend sell-off.

NVIDIA Split Announcement Raises Red Flag

The systems chip manufacturer announced a four-for-one stock split on Friday morning, effective on July 20th.

Singapore clears LSE deal for Refinitiv after FX pledge

Singapore's competition authority has approved the London Stock Exchange Group's $27 billion acquisition of data and analytics company Refinitiv provided the bourse continues to offer certain foreign exchange benchmarks to rivals. The Competition and Consumer Commission of Singapore (CCCS)gave the conditional approval after examining whether the deal, which transforms the 300 year old bourse into a one-stop shop for data, trading and analytics, threatened competition in the currency market. The LSE has committed to making Refinitiv's WM/Reuters foreign exchange benchmarks available to existing and future customers to provide index licencing services or clearing services in Singapore, CCCS said in a statement, adding that the commitment, effective from Monday, was for 10 years.

First Warning Sign in Global Commodity Boom Flashes in China

(Bloomberg) -- One pillar of this year’s blistering commodities rally -- Chinese demand -- may be teetering.Beijing aced its economic recovery from the pandemic largely via an expansion in credit and a state-aided construction boom that sucked in raw materials from across the planet. Already the world’s biggest consumer, China spent $150 billion on crude oil, iron ore and copper ore alone in the first four months of 2021. Resurgent demand and rising prices mean that’s $36 billion more than the same period last year.With global commodities rising to record highs, Chinese government officials are trying to temper prices and reduce some of the speculative froth that’s driven markets. Wary of inflating asset bubbles, the People’s Bank of China has also been restricting the flow of money to the economy since last year, albeit gradually to avoid derailing growth. At the same time, funding for infrastructure projects has shown signs of slowing.Economic data for April suggest that both China’s economic expansion and its credit impulse -- new credit as a percentage of GDP -- may already have crested, putting the rally on a precarious footing. The most obvious impact of China’s deleveraging would fall on those metals keyed to real estate and infrastructure spending, from copper and aluminum, to steel and its main ingredient, iron ore.“Credit is a major driver for commodity prices, and we reckon prices peak when credit peaks,” said Alison Li, co-head of base metals research at Mysteel in Shanghai. “That refers to global credit, but Chinese credit accounts for a big part of it, especially when it comes to infrastructure and property investment.”But the impact of China’s credit pullback could ripple far and wide, threatening the rally in global oil prices and even China’s crop markets. And while tighter money supply hasn’t stopped many metals hitting eye-popping levels in recent weeks, some, like copper, are already seeing consumers shying away from higher prices.“The slowdown in credit will have a negative impact on China’s demand for commodities,” said Hao Zhou, senior emerging markets economist at Commerzbank AG. “So far, property and infrastructure investments haven’t shown an obvious deceleration. But they are likely to trend lower in the second half of this year.”A lag between the withdrawal of credit and stimulus from the economy and its impact on China’s raw material purchases may mean that markets haven’t yet peaked. However, its companies may eventually soften imports due to tighter credit conditions, which means the direction of the global commodity market will hinge on how much the recovery in economies including the U.S. and Europe can continue to drive prices higher.Some sectors have seen policy push an expansion in capacity, such as Beijing’s move to grow the country’s crude oil refining and copper smelting industries. Purchases of the materials needed for production in those sectors may continue to see gains although at a slower pace.One example of slowing purchases is likely to be in refined copper, said Mysteel’s Li. The premium paid for the metal at the port of Yangshan has already hit a four-year low in a sign of waning demand, and imports are likely to fall this year, she said.At the same time, the rally in copper prices probably still has a few months to run, according to a recent note from Citigroup Inc., citing the lag between peak credit and peak demand. From around $9,850 a ton now, the bank expects copper to reach $12,200 by September.It’s a dynamic that’s also playing out in ferrous metals markets.“We’re still at an early phase of tightening in terms of money reaching projects,” said Tomas Gutierrez, an analyst at Kallanish Commodities Ltd. “Iron ore demand reacts with a lag of several months to tightening. Steel demand is still around record highs on the back of the economic recovery and ongoing investments, but is likely to pull back slightly by the end of the year.”For agriculture, credit tightening may only affect China’s soaring crop imports around the margins, said Ma Wenfeng, an analyst at Beijing Orient Agribusiness Consultant Co. Less cash in the system could soften domestic prices by curbing speculation, which may in turn reduce the small proportion of imports handled by private firms, he said.The wider trend is for China’s state-owned giants to keep importing grains to cover the nation’s domestic shortfall, to replenish state reserves and to meet trade deal obligations with the U.S.No DisasterMore broadly, Beijing’s policy tightening doesn’t spell disaster for commodities bulls. For one, the authorities are unlikely to accelerate deleveraging from this point, according the latest comments from the State Council, China’s cabinet.“Internal guidance from our macro department is that the country won’t tighten credit too much -- they just won’t loosen further,” said Harry Jiang, head of trading and research at Yonggang Resouces, a commodity trader in Shanghai. “We don’t have many concerns over credit tightening.”And in any case, raw materials markets are no longer almost entirely in thrall to Chinese demand.“In the past, the inflection point of industrial metal prices often coincides with that of China’s credit cycle,” said Larry Hu, chief China economist at Macquarie Group Ltd. “But that doesn’t mean it will be like that this time too, because the U.S. has unleashed much larger stimulus than China, and its demand is very strong.”Hu also pointed to caution among China’s leaders, who probably don’t want to risk choking off their much-admired recovery by sharp swings in policy.“I expect China’s property investment will slow down, but not by too much,” he said. “Infrastructure investment hasn’t changed too much in the past few years, and won’t this year either.”Additionally, China has been pumping up consumer spending as a lever for growth, and isn’t as reliant on infrastructure and property investment as it used to be, said Bruce Pang, head of macro and strategy research at China Renaissance Securities Hong Kong. The disruption to global commodities supply because of the pandemic is also a new factor that can support prices, he said.Other policy priorities, such as cutting steel production to make inroads on China’s climate pledges, or boosting the supply of energy products, whether domestically or via purchases from overseas, are other complicating factors when it comes to assessing import demand and prices for specific commodities, according to analysts.(Updates copper price in 11th paragraph.)More stories like this are available on bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

Lim family's global assets on radar after Singapore court move

SINGAPORE (Reuters) -A Singapore court has approved a freeze on up to $3.5 billion of assets of the family behind collapsed Hin Leong Trading Pte Ltd, boosting the prospect of debt recovery from the former oil trading empire that counts some of the world's biggest banks among its creditors. Hin Leong was wound up in March after failing in a year-long effort to restructure more than $3 billion in debts after the COVID-19-led oil crash laid bare huge losses. Founder Lim Oon Kuin admitted in a court document last year to directing the company not to disclose hundreds of millions of dollars in losses over several years.

St. Louis Fed's Bullard: Most cryptocurrencies are 'worthless'

St. Louis Fed President James Bullard told Yahoo Finance that among the thousands of private cryptocurrencies out there, 'most of them are worthless.'



Comments:

  1. Galar

    I mean you are wrong. Enter we'll discuss it.

  2. Elliot

    Wonderful, this is a funny phrase

  3. Bardolph

    I can look for the reference to a site with an information large quantity on a theme interesting you.

  4. Dustan

    Agree, useful information

  5. Dalkis

    We will speak to this topic.



Write a message